All Saints Church of England Primary School

All Saints Church of EnglandPrimary School

Subjects

Science

Purpose of study from the national curriculum

A high-quality science education provides the foundations for understanding the world through the specific disciplines of biology, chemistry and physics. Science has changed our lives and is vital to the world’s future prosperity, and all pupils should be taught essential aspects of the knowledge, methods, processes and uses of science. Through building up a body of key foundational knowledge and concepts, pupils should be encouraged to recognise the power of rational explanation and develop a sense of excitement and curiosity about natural phenomena. They should be encouraged to understand how science can be used to explain what is occurring, predict how things will behave, and analyse causes.

Intent

The national curriculum for science aims to ensure that all pupils:

  • develop scientific knowledge and conceptual understanding through the specific disciplines of biology, chemistry and physics.
  • develop understanding of the nature, processes and methods of science through different types of science enquiries that help them to answer scientific questions about the world around them.
  • are equipped with the scientific knowledge required to understand the uses and implications of science, today and for the future.

 The school curriculum for science

  • To draw on the local communities and global communities
  • Ask and answer scientific questions
  • Plan and carry out scientific investigations
  • Evaluate evidence and present their conclusions clearly and accurately

Science Policy

Science curriculum

History

Purpose of study from the national curriculum

 A high-quality history education will help pupils gain a coherent knowledge and understanding of Britain’s past and that of the wider world. It should inspire pupils’ curiosity to know more about the past. Teaching should equip pupils to ask perceptive questions, think critically, weigh evidence, sift arguments, and develop perspective and judgement. History helps pupils to understand the complexity of peoples’ lives, the process of change, the diversity of societies and relationships between different groups, as well as their own identity and the challenges of their time (The National Curriculum in England 2014)..

 Intent

The national curriculum for history aims to ensure that all pupils:

  • know and understand the history of these islands as a coherent, chronological narrative, from the earliest times to the present day: how people’s lives have shaped this nation and how Britain has influenced and been influenced by the wider world
  • know and understand significant aspects of the history of the wider world: the nature of ancient civilisations; the expansion and dissolution of empires; characteristic features of past non-European societies; achievements and follies of mankind
  • gain and deploy a historically grounded understanding of abstract terms such as : ‘empire’, ‘civilisation’, ‘parliament’ and ‘peasantry’
  • understand historical concepts such as continuity and change, cause and consequence, similarity, difference and significance, and use them to make connections, draw contrasts, analyse trends, frame historically-valid questions and create their own structured accounts, including written narratives and analyses
  • understand the methods of historical enquiry, including how evidence is used rigorously to make historical claims, and discern how and why contrasting arguments and interpretations of the past have been constructed
  • gain historical perspective by placing their growing knowledge into different contexts, understanding the connections between local, regional, national and international history; between cultural, economic, military, political, religious and social history; and between short-term and long-term timescales.

The school curriculum for History aims to:

  • Allow children to draw on the local community and global communities.
  • Help children understand society and their place in it.

History Policy

History Curriculum

Geography

A high-quality geography education should inspire in pupils a curiosity and fascination about the world and its people that will remain with them for the rest of their lives. Teaching should equip pupils with knowledge about diverse places, people, resources and natural and human environments, together with a deep understanding of the Earth’s key physical and human processes. As pupils progress, their growing knowledge about the world should help them to deepen their understanding of the interaction between physical and human processes, and of the formation and use of landscapes and environments. Geographical knowledge, understanding and skills provide the frameworks and approaches that explain how the Earth’s features at different scales are shaped, interconnected and change over time.

Intent

The national curriculum for geography aims to ensure that all pupils:

  • develop contextual knowledge of the location of globally significant places – both terrestrial and marine – including their defining physical and human characteristics and how these provide a geographical context for understanding the actions of processes
  • understand the processes that give rise to key physical and human geographical features of the world, how these are interdependent and how they bring about spatial variation and change over time
  • are competent in the geographical skills needed to:
  • collect, analyse and communicate with a range of data gathered through experiences of fieldwork that deepen their understanding of geographical processes
  • interpret a range of sources of geographical information, including maps, diagrams, globes, aerial photographs and Geographical Information Systems (GIS)
  • communicate geographical information in a variety of ways, including through maps, numerical and quantitative skills and writing at length.

 

The school curriculum for geography aims to ensure that all pupils:

  • develop an awareness of different places, people and cultures

are encouraged to commit to sustainable development and an appreciation of what ‘global citizenship’ means

Geography Policy

Geography Curriculum

Art

Purpose of study from the national curriculum

Art, craft and design embody some of the highest forms of human creativity. A high-quality art and design education should engage, inspire and challenge pupils, equipping them with the knowledge and skills to experiment, invent and create their own works of art, craft and design. As pupils progress, they should be able to think critically and develop a more rigorous understanding of art and design. They should also know how art and design both reflect and shape our history, and contribute to the culture, creativity and wealth of our nation (The National Curriculum in England 2014).

Intent

The national curriculum for art and design aims to ensure that all pupils:

  • produce creative work, exploring their ideas and recording their experiences
  • become proficient in drawing, painting, sculpture and other art, craft and design techniques
  • evaluate and analyse creative works using the language of art, craft and design
  • know about great artists, craft makers and designers, and understand the historical and cultural development of their art forms.

 The school curriculum for art and design aims to ensure that all pupils:

  • Are confident mark-makers and encouraged to experiment with materials
  • Have opportunities to reflect upon their own and other’s work in order to inform future decisions and practice.
  • Have opportunities to create art from starting points relating to the local area and/or local artists.
  • Have opportunities to consider how Art and Design reflects or can reflect global places and/or issues.

ART POLICY

Art and Design Curriculum

Music

Purpose of study from the national curriculum

Music is a universal language that embodies one of the highest forms of creativity. A high-quality music education should engage and inspire pupils to develop a love of music and their talent as musicians, and so increase their self-confidence, creativity and sense of achievement. As pupils progress, they should develop a critical engagement with music, allowing them to compose, and to listen with discrimination to the best in the musical canon.

Intent

The national curriculum for music aims to ensure that all pupils:

  • perform, listen to, review and evaluate music across a range of historical periods, genres, styles and traditions, including the works of the great composers and musicians
  • learn to sing and to use their voices, to create and compose music on their own and with others, have the opportunity to learn a musical instrument, use technology appropriately and have the opportunity to progress to the next level of musical excellence
  • understand and explore how music is created, produced and communicated, including through the interrelated dimensions: pitch, duration, dynamics, tempo, timbre, texture, structure and appropriate musical notations

 The school curriculum for Music will

  • draw on the local community and global communities
  • provide opportunities for all children to create, play, perform and enjoy music

Music Policy

Music Curriculum

Modern Foreign Language- French

Curriculum intent

Purpose of study from the national curriculum

Learning a foreign language is a liberation from insularity and provides an opening to other cultures. A high-quality languages education should foster pupils’ curiosity and deepen their understanding of the world. The teaching should enable pupils to express their ideas and thoughts in another language and to understand and respond to its speakers, both in speech and in writing. It should also provide opportunities for them to communicate for practical purposes, learn new ways of thinking and read great literature in the original language. Language teaching should provide the foundation for learning further languages, equipping pupils to study and work in other countries. 

 Aim

The national curriculum for foreign languages aims to ensure that all pupils:

  • understand and respond to spoken and written language from a variety of authentic sources
  • speak with increasing confidence, fluency and spontaneity, finding ways of communicating what they want to say, including through discussion and asking questions, and continually improving the accuracy of their pronunciation and intonation
  • can write at varying length, for different purposes and audiences, using the variety of grammatical structures that they have learnt
  • discover and develop an appreciation of a range of writing in the language studied.

 The school curriculum for foreign languages aims to:

  • enable children to learn French.
  • value and promote children’s alternative home languages
  • help children understand the use of different languages in real life, valuing and drawing on knowledge and experiences of the local community and global communities.

Modern Foreign Languages Policy

Languages Curriculum

P.S.H.E- including Sex and Relationship Education

Introduction

All schools must provide a curriculum that is broadly based, balanced and meets the needs of all pupils. Under section 78 of the Education Act 2002 and the Academies Act 2010, a PSHE curriculum:

  • Promotes the spiritual, moral, cultural, mental and physical development of pupils at the school and of society, and
  • Prepares pupils at the school for the opportunities, responsibilities and experiences of later life.

PSHE

At All Saints primary school, we teach Personal, Social, Health Education as a whole-school approach to underpin children’s development as people and because we believe that this also supports their learning capacity.

The Jigsaw Programme offers us a comprehensive, carefully thought-through Scheme of Work which brings consistency and progression to our children’s learning in this vital curriculum area.

The overview of the programme can be seen on the school website.

This also supports the “Personal Development”and  “Behaviour and Attitude” aspects required under the Ofsted Inspection Framework, as well as significantly contributing to the school’s Safeguarding and Equality Duties, the Government’s British Values aganda and the SMSC (Spiritual, Moral, Social, Cultural) development opportunities provided for our children.

Statutory Relationships and Health Education

“The Relationships Education, Relationships and Sex Education and Health Education (England) Regulations 2019, made under sections 34 and 35 of the Children and Social Work Act 2017, make Relationships Education compulsory for all pupils receiving primary education…They also make Health Education compulsory in all schools except independent schools. Personal, Social, Health and Economic Education(PSHE) continues to be compulsory in independent schools.”

Personal, Social Health Education Policy including Relationship and Sex Education

Design & Technology

Curriculum intent

 Purpose of study from the national curriculum

Design and technology is an inspiring, rigorous and practical subject. Using creativity and imagination, pupils design and make products that solve real and relevant problems within a variety of contexts, considering their own and others’ needs, wants and values. They acquire a broad range of subject knowledge and draw on disciplines such as: mathematics, science, engineering, computing and art. Pupils learn how to take risks, becoming resourceful, innovative, enterprising and capable citizens. Through the evaluation of past and present design and technology, they develop a critical understanding of its impact on daily life and the wider world. High-quality design and technology education makes an essential contribution to the creativity, culture, wealth and well-being of the nation (The National Curriculum in England 2014).

Aims

The national curriculum for design and technology aims to ensure that all pupils:

  • develop the creative, technical and practical expertise needed to perform everyday tasks confidently and to participate successfully in an increasingly technological world
  • build and apply a repertoire of knowledge, understanding and skills in order to design and make high-quality prototypes and products for a wide range of users
  • critique, evaluate and test their ideas and products and the work of others
  • understand and apply the principles of nutrition and learn how to cook.

Design and Technology Policy

Design Technology Curriculum 2014

Religious Education

Curriculum intent

Purpose of study from the national curriculum

The curriculum is all the planned activities that we organise in order to promote learning and personal growth and development. Our school curriculum consists of the formal requirements of National Curriculum, Locally Agreed Syllabus for Religious Education and the range of extra activities that the school organises in order to enrich the experience of the children. It also includes the ‘school curriculum’, or what the children learn from the way they are treated and expected to behave.

 Aims

  • To provide pupils with a broad and balanced introduction to the study of Christianity and other world faiths in accordance with the requirements of the Trust Deed of the school, the current Education Act and following the recommendations of the Diocesan Board of Education.
  • To know the place and significance of Christianity and other religions in the contemporary world with emphasis on Christian beliefs and practices.
  • To provide the children with the knowledge and understanding of Christianity and knowledge of and respect for other faiths and cultures.
  • To draw on the local community and global communities.
  • To help children to develop the necessary skills to reflect on their own experiences (both good, bad, happy and sad), to learn from them and to develop their own identity, personal beliefs and values.
  • To think deeply and explore the great questions of life, death, meaning and purpose.
  • To become active citizens, showing consideration of others both locally, nationally and globally.
  • RE in All Saints’ Church of England school lies at the very heart of the curriculum

Religious Education Policy